Chugach Children’s Forest Expedition: Day 2

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Today, we continue with the second installment of field blogs from the Chugach Children’s Forest Expedition series
.

June 20, 2009

Latouche Island: Jenny

Today has been really neat. We visited an old mining town that has been bulldozed over, and all that remains from it is tons of rubble, and one building remains standing. It was interesting to see such a place. We got to hear about the history of the town, as well as all the attemptsCIMG8969.JPG to build lodges out there once the town no longer existed. Another thing that we got the opportunity to do today was digging for oil that remains from the Exxon Valdez oil spill. The first beach we visited, we couldn’t find any because the tide was too high, but once we gave up and all got back on the boat, they called us back to shore to see the oil they had discovered. I didn’t bother putting on my rain pants, and hopped in the boat to head to shore. When we got there, what I saw changed the way I thought about the whole incident. Seeing the oil just below the surface rocks, and deep down below them, really makes it overwhelming how much destruction there was in this catastrophe. I always heard about the oil that still remains, but once you’re there digging in it, getting that thick, black, smelly substance all over everything it comes in contact with, it really is an eye opener. After today, I want to share what I’ve experienced and encourage people to protect their environment, and hopefully teach people how to take responsibility for their actions. 

Photo credit:  Alexandra von Wichman/Babkin Charters

Humpback Cove: Mary
 
Today was very outrageous. When I drove the skiff I had some experience driving and [it] Thumbnail image for IMG_0208.JPGhelped me notice the wildlife. The waves that we made and the birds and fish we saw made me realize how beautiful Alaska is. The scenery is truly the best part. I am truly a city girl, so when I saw all of this beauty I just was surprised. We were in the skiff for two hours. I have had a wonderful time today and this Media Expedition is a life time experience. Go BOB (skiff).

Photo credit:  Melissa Goslin


Humpback Cove: Alex

To start off my Saturday on the Prince William Sound, I woke up to the
sound of breakfast calling my name. Poppyseed muffins. My favorite!
After eating breakfast and getting ready, we headed to LaTouche Island.
We started getting history about it from a person who owns a cabin
there. Her name was Kate McLaughlin. We went on a hike on Latouche and
learned about the mining and what happened there. Then we went over to
another part of the island to gather oil from the ground from the Exxon
Valdez Oil Spill. We learned about what happened during the spill and
how it travelled so far. We gathered actual oil from under rocks at the
beach. It was horrible how it actually affected the lands and
subsistence living. I was disappointed to learn that the spill affected
people’s lives. After we did a long talk on the beach about the events,
we headed to Humpback Cove. At Humpback Cove a few of us kids decided
to jump off the boat into the water. It was very fun. Then we hung out
and rode around in our zodiacs. After seeing a fish jump right in front
of us I had to go fishing. I didn’t catch anything but it was still
fun. It was about nighttime by the time we got back.
IMG_0301.JPG
Photo credit:  Melissa Goslin

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