Making the Water-Energy Connection

EEWeek_ShowerHead.jpgJessica Culverhouse is program manager for National Environmental Education Week (EE Week), a program of the National Environmental Education Foundation designed to connect educators with resources to improve K-12 students’ understanding of the environment. EE Week will be held this year from April 11-17. To get involved, visit http://www.eeweek.org.

Have you ever wondered how far your water travels from its source to your kitchen faucet? Or thought about the energy required to heat the water for your shower? Did you know that water is a key component in the process of producing electricity from coal and other thermoelectric energy sources?

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Above: In most homes and schools, water heating is second only to HVAC in terms of electricity requirements.


Generating power consumes three percent of our nation’s water annually
while thirteen percent of the energy produced each year is used to treat,
transport and heat our water (source: River Network). Conserving water
saves energy, and vice versa. Our nation’s water and energy resources
are increasingly important topics of discussion not just in the news,
but in classrooms and homes as well. The water-energy connection is
complex, but it provides an excellent opportunity to reflect on the
interrelatedness of ecological, geographical and environmental
concerns.

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Energy and water are deeply interconnected, and EE Week provides resources for educators to help students better understand this complex issue.

This April 11-17, thousands of educators and students will investigate
the water-energy connection as part of National Environmental Education
Week (EE Week) by taking part in a variety of activities on the topics
of water and energy. Some are planning school water and energy audits
in math and science classes. Geography and social studies teachers are
organizing research projects about the sources of fresh water around
the globe and the energy required to transport it. Others have
developed projects in which students express the water and energy
connection through art and poetry.

Join us for a week of teaching and learning about this complex issue by
participating in EE Week. It’s free and easy–just complete the brief
online registration form. You’ll have access to a wealth of teaching
resources on the water-energy connection and other environmental
topics, as well as funding resources, professional development for
educators and discounts from some of our partners.

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A young student explores his watershed as part of National Environmental Education Week 2009 activities.

Educators and others who register for EE Week by March 25 will also be
invited to participate in our first ever webinar–Teaching the
Water-Energy Connection–to be held on Wednesday, March 31 at 6:30
p.m. Eastern time. This event is designed by and for educators and will
provide an opportunity for teachers to learn more about the issue and
get ideas on lesson plans and projects to engage students in
investigating the water-energy connection.


Jessica Culverhouse

Images courtesy Energy Star, NEEF, U.S. Department of Energy

4 responses to “Making the Water-Energy Connection

  1. Excellent news, I look forward to more of the HTML5 form stuff and especially its incorporation into JavaScript UI libraries. Except… how will web developers eat if they can’t charge for “Enter search term here” form enhancements ;-)

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