Hurricanes Igor and Julia Storm the Atlantic

Hurricane Igor.jpgRemember Earl?

The hurricane-turned-tropical-storm that swept the Eastern seaboard over Labor Day Weekend? Well, meet his younger – but possibly bigger – brother, Igor. While Earl reached up to a category 4 level as he traveled over the Atlantic, Igor may reach as high as a category 5! Hurricane Igor is the fourth hurricane of the 2010 Atlantic Hurricane season, and is making his way westward across the Atlantic Ocean. Not far behind Igor is Hurricane Julia, the fifth hurricane and tenth storm to be named in the 2010 season. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association’s (NOAA) Hurricane Center shows the location of each storm on this cyclone activity map.


Igor, currently a category 4 storm, could possibly become a category 5,
the highest possible level for a hurricane. Luckily, there is no
immediate threat of the storm making landfall through the end of the
week. Hopefully Igor will follow in the footsteps of his older brother
and die down to a much smaller storm before hitting land – if he hits
land at all. Curious to see Igor’s predicted route? Check out this 5 day forecast from Weather Underground.

Hard
to imagine such a huge storm happening while you enjoy sunny, blue
skies? NASA offers a different view of the hurricane in this video taken from space. The outer space perspective paired with the live footage makes the hurricane seem that much more believable!

Just in case Igor and Julia diverge from their predicted paths, here is a great resource for hurricane preparedness information.
NOAA’s Hurricane Center gives hurricane history, facts, and figures, as
well as advice for how to properly prepare for hurricanes.

Ever wondered how storms got their names? NOAA’s Hurricane Center shares a short history of naming hurricanes on their website. Did you know that before 1979, storms were only named after females?

Hurricane
Igor and tropical storm Julia are still churning their way across the
Atlantic, so stay tuned to the MWW blog for more on the storms as they
develop!

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