China Invests in Tidal Energy

BUSINESS

A race is under way to unlock one of the world’s biggest untapped sources of clean energy—the ocean—with China emerging as an important testing ground. (Wall Street Journal)

Use our resources to better understand tidal energy.

Tidal energy is a renewable energy powered by the natural rise and fall of ocean tides and currents. Illustration by Nick Kaloterakis, National Geographic

Tidal energy is a renewable energy powered by the natural rise and fall of ocean tides and currents.
Illustration by Nick Kaloterakis, National Geographic

Discussion Ideas

 

  • Why do you think a Western business news service like the Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is interested in China’s tidal energy investments?
    • Commercial-scale tidal power requires an enormous economic investment. The WSJ article mentions half a dozen Western companies involved in tidal power technology. (The red and green lozenges display publicly traded companies’ current stock information.) Many of these firms are eager to enter the lucrative Chinese market, including American engineering giant Lockheed Martin.

 

  • Read the Wall Street Journal article and our short encyclopedic entry on tidal energy. What are some elements necessary for a region to establish tidal power facilities?
    • coastline
    • large and predictable tidal range (tidal range is the difference between high tide and low tide)
    • sophisticated engineering technology (to plan, design, implement, and maintain different tidal power structures suited to a region’s undersea landscape and weather conditions)
    • money—tidal energy is still a very expensive source of electricity

 

  • Take a look at our MapMaker Interactive layer on solar, tidal, and wave energy generation. Considering the elements necessary for tidal power facilities, what nations do you think might be good candidates to expand their tidal energy portfolio?
    • Look for politically stable, industrialized nations with long coastlines—Australia, China, India, Mexico, the United Kingdom, South Africa, U.S., Canada, Japan, the Koreas, countries in Scandinavia . . .

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s