Adventuring in Pristine Seas

This month, National Geographic’s Pristine Seas team has set off once again to explore one of the last “wild” places in the ocean, and they’re inviting classrooms to come along with them!

The Pristine Seas expedition aims to protect some of the last relatively untouched parts of our world’s ocean. They travel to places largely unknown, and they photograph, blog and research the vibrant ocean life they find there. With their research and publicity, they hope to protect these magical places from encroaching threats such as climate change or overfishing.

Alan Friedlander conducting scientific surveys while diving on the National Geographic Pristine Seas Mozambique expedition. Photo by Dave McAloney.

Alan Friedlander conducting scientific surveys while diving on the National Geographic Pristine Seas Mozambique expedition. Photo by Dave McAloney.

This April, the Pristine Seas team is exploring the warm waters of Mozambique. Living there are some of the healthiest East African reefs as well as some of the healthiest populations of marine megafauna such as manta rays, dugongs and whale sharks.

It is very easy to follow along with these scientists on their adventures. Simply check out the Explorers Journal blog where Expedition Leader Paul Rose keeps us updated on the team’s activities. From a run-in with an octopus to the clear morning song of local fisherman, the team shares their adventures and of course, gorgeous photographs.

SeahorseMozambiqueCrManuSanFélix

Divers observed this seahorse tucked in the green seagrass while on expedition in Mozambique. Photo by Manu San Félix.

So why is this more than just another awesome expedition from National Geographic? Because it’s such a great opportunity for classroom connections!

Are your students learning about the food chain, coral reefs or ocean currents? How about issues like climate change, overfishing or loss of biodiversity? You can find real-life examples of all of these topics in Rose’s blog posts.

StarfishinMozambiqueCrManuSanFélix

Starfish observed by the National Geographic Pristine Seas expedition divers in Mozambique. Photo by Manu San Félix.

This expedition isn’t limited to traditionally scientific topics either. In one blog post, your students can read about the Nemos Pequenos group of local children who have become experts in studying the ocean environment. Students can also read about local fisherman and their traditional Mozambican fishing dhows, making connections, as the explorers do, between the natural environment and the people who live there.

A parrotfish is seen during a dive off the coast of southern Mozambique. Photo by Dave McAloney.

A parrotfish is seen during a dive off the coast of southern Mozambique. Photo by Dave McAloney.

Even if this expedition doesn’t link directly with what you are doing in your classroom this month, why miss this opportunity to pass along true exploration and passion to your students? Follow along with the Explorers Journal for National Geographic’s upcoming adventures, and explore the National Geographic education site for more resources. It’s never too early (or too late!) to inspire a love for the earth in your students.

Want even more cool classroom collections? Take a look at our collection of education resources connected with previous Pristine Seas expeditions. Here you can find great articles, photos, videos and more.

By Rebecca Bice, National Geographic’s Center for Geo-Education

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s