Kipling on Ice

BUSINESS

Just in time for National Poetry Month—and the Stanley Cup Playoffs—the Boston Bruins are using a Rudyard Kipling poem in a new ad. (Boston Globe)

Use our resources to explore other Kipling poems.

Discussion Ideas

  • Listen to the poem “The Law for the Wolves” in the ad above. Do you think this poem was a good choice to represent the Boston Bruins? Why or why not? If you ran an ad agency, what other products, services, or organizations would you promote using this poem?
    • I think it’s a great ad, beautifully read by the actor. It emphasizes teamwork, individual responsibility, strength, toughness, and tenacity—all things a hockey team needs.
    • “The Law for the Wolves” might also be a good motivating poem for a military unit, a multi-player or MMORPG alliance, or even a start-up venture emphasizing a responsible, team-oriented approach to business.

 

  • “The Law for the Wolves” is actually a lot longer (and, possibly, plagiarized) than the ad indicates. Read the poem here. Why do you think Arnold Worldwide, the ad agency that created “The Wolfpack” ad, did not use the whole poem? Why do you think they chose those lines?
    • The opening lines, used in the ad, are a great metaphor for teamwork. The rest of the poem is pretty specific to Kipling’s story, part of The Second Jungle Book—it sets up the way the wolf pack is organized and governed.
    • It’s also simply too long for a 30-second ad.

 

 

  • Kipling was English, but few of his works take place in England. “The Law for the Wolves,” for instance, is from the second of his famous short-story collections called The Jungle Book, set in India. Kipling’s Just-So Stories focus on animals indigenous to Africa (“How the Leopard Got His Spots”), Australia (“The Sing-Song of Old Man Kangaroo”), and the Americas (“The Beginning of the Armadillos”). Several poems captured in our “Khyber Pass” media spotlight focus on Afghanistan. Why do you think Kipling, writing in the 19th century, was writing about such diverse places?

 

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