Surfing Hawaiian Culture

SPORTS

Surfing was once the sport of island chiefs. Today, it binds Hawaiians to their cultural identity. (National Geographic magazine)

Learn more about surfing with our resources!

Graphic by Fernando G. Baptista, National Geographic

Graphic by Fernando G. Baptista, National Geographic

Discussion Ideas

 

 

Map by Jerome N. Cookson, National Geographic

Map by Jerome N. Cookson, National Geographic

 

  • The Nat Geo article makes a great point of saying that surfing is a vital part of Hawaiian cultural identity. Is there an activity, pastime, or tradition that is a part of your own cultural identity?
From cradle . . . On a day off from his job as a beach lifeguard, Mel Pu‘u plays with three of his eight kids in the Makaha surf. “I grew up in the ocean. So did all my children,” he says. Photograph by Paul Nicklen, National Geographic

From cradle . . . On a day off from his job as a beach lifeguard, Mel Pu‘u plays with three of his eight kids in the Makaha surf. “I grew up in the ocean. So did all my children,” he says.
Photograph by Paul Nicklen, National Geographic

to youth . . . Best friends dive under a wave on their way to a surfing spot near their hometown of Makaha. Photograph by Paul Nicklen, National Geographic

to youth . . . Best friends dive under a wave on their way to a surfing spot near their hometown of Makaha.
Photograph by Paul Nicklen, National Geographic

to grave . . . Family and friends paddle out to sea off the coast of Waikiki to hold a funeral for surfer and surfing teacher. Photograph by Paul Nicklen, National Geographic

to grave . . . Family and friends paddle out to sea off the coast of Waikiki to hold a funeral for surfer and surfing teacher.
Photograph by Paul Nicklen, National Geographic

 

TEACHERS’ TOOLKIT

Nat Geo: Hawaiian Renaissance—Beyond the glitz of tourist beaches, locals cling to the spirit of the ocean

Nat Geo: What is Surfing?

2 responses to “Surfing Hawaiian Culture

  1. Pingback: Visit the Star Wars Universe Without Ever Leaving Planet Earth | Nat Geo Education Blog·

  2. Pingback: The United States of Emoji | Nat Geo Education Blog·

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