Who Is Fighting Whom in Syria?

POLITICS

After years of civil war, Syria is now a country that lies in ruins. Thousands of people have died, millions have fled. With no end of the war in sight, groups continue to battle for control over large parts of the country. The Syrian government, ISIL, Kurdish factions, and several other rebel groups are still fighting for some of the most important parts of the country. (New York Times and Al Jazeera)

Navigate the international response with our 1-Page Map of Syria and today’s MapMaker Interactive map.

Teachers, scroll down for a quick list of key resources in our Teachers’ Toolkit, including a link to today’s MapMaker Interactive map.

This great map from Al Jazeera and the Institute for the Study of War outlines battle fronts in the ongoing Syrian Civil War.Map courtesy Al Jazeera and the Institute for the Study of War

This is a great military map from Al Jazeera and the Institute for the Study of War. For a more detailed and up-to-date look at the geography of war in Syria, check out the fascinating map here.
Map courtesy Al Jazeera and the Institute for the Study of War

Click on each of the countries or regions highlighted in today’s MapMaker Interactive map to see how they support different factions in Syria. A key player not represented on the map is the Arab League, which as supported opposition forces in Syria. (Some members of the Arab League, such as Algeria and Saudi Arabia, are represented on today’s map.) See a map of the Arab League here.

Click on each of the countries or regions highlighted in today’s MapMaker Interactive map to see how they support different factions in Syria. A key player not represented on the map is the Arab League. (Some members of the Arab League, such as Algeria and Saudi Arabia, are represented on today’s map.) See a map of the Arab League here.

Discussion Ideas

 

  • The short, clear New York Times article outlines foreign support for most leading belligerents in the Syrian Civil War. Which major players did they leave out? Why?
    • The NYT article did not mention specific support for the Kurds or ISIS. Neither Kurdistan or ISIS is recognized as a state, and official states have not supported either group at the expense of others.
      • Kurdish groups are often mentioned as part of the broad rebel opposition, tacitly supported by some foreign alliances (Operation Inherent Resolve) and opposed by others (Turkey).
      • Islamic State is officially opposed by all foreign governments.

 

TEACHERS’ TOOLKIT

New York Times: Who Is Fighting Whom in Syria

Al Jazeera: Syrian Civil War Map

Nat Geo: Syria 1-Page Map

Nat Geo: Taking Sides in Syria interactive map

Nat Geo: What is ISIS?

Financial Times: Isis’s advance in Iraq interactive map

CIA World Factbook: Syria

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