Elementary Schoolers Explore Underwater Robotics

This week is Explorers Week, when National Geographic brings together some of the most interesting scientists and explorers making a difference in the world today.

In honor of the occasion, the Education team challenged a group of local teachers to design an end-of-year project focusing on one of National Geographic’s 2016 Emerging Explorers. We’ll be sharing their class’ stories all week on the Education Blog.

Educator: Flora Lerenman

Emerging Explorer StudiedDavid Lang

Grade Level: Kindergarten, 2-5

School: H.D. Cooke Elementary School in Washington, D.C.

Flora on her class’ project:

For our National Geographic Explorers Week project, we researched David Lang and created our own graphic-design Infographics that we shared with other students in the school during an enrichment cluster fair. We also 3D-printed mini OpenROV robots to take part in the Maker Movement that David Lang is so actively involved in, and we made a mini-movie.

florasinfo2

Graphic by Thanh Thao

floras-info1

Graphic by Jacqueline

 

Flora’s class 3-D printed a mini robot much like the ones David Lang works on.

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Wondering what student’s took away from this experience? Natalie explains below, in her own words.

He made an underwater robot for treasure, but then he found something more valuable than treasure. He found friendship with the robot and that other people can use it also…and they can be engineers just like him.

 

Want more Explorers Week brain food? Join us here or follow us on Facebook and Twitter for our Explorers Week 2016, June 13-17. It’s an exciting opportunity to connect with National Geographic scientists, conservationists, and storytellers. Learn about their latest discoveries and adventures, participate virtually in inspiring presentations, and join the important conversation about how we can all make a difference in our world.

One response to “Elementary Schoolers Explore Underwater Robotics

  1. Pingback: Discover | cptsheller·

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