13 Things We Learned this Week!

What did you learn this week? Let us know in the comments or at education@ngs.org.

This week, we learned …

… how to sign the Declaration of Independence—in a founding father’s handwriting.
dec of i

 

 

… how to cut the perfect slice of pizza. Or, at least, a much more complex one.

 

 

… giraffes did NOT evolve long necks to reach treetop greenery.

No, this isn't the L.A. Zoo and that tree isn't invasive. This gorgeous giraffe is assessing the all-natural acacia buffet in Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. Photograph by George F. Mobley, National Geographic

This gorgeous giraffe is assessing the all-natural acacia buffet in Serengeti National Park, Tanzania.
Photograph by George F. Mobley, National Geographic

 

 

… why misconceptions are so powerful—and how educators can avoid reinforcing them.

 

 

… how to play Summer Reading Bingo!

NYPL Summer Reading Bingo-1

Click to download and print this Summer Reading Bingo card from the good folks at the NYPL’s Port Richmond Library!

 

 

… roads paved with pig manure could drive a cleaner future.

 

 

… Disney princesses really do have an impact on little girls—and little boys. (A great reason to revisit one of our favorite videos!)

 

 

a 700-year-old African farming practice could help mitigate climate change, and ancient wheat may be the future of food.

“African dark earths” refers to the nutrient-rich soils created as homemakers add kitchen waste and charcoal to nutrient-poor tropical soil. Photograph by Chris Johns, National Geographic

“African dark earths” refers to the nutrient-rich soils created as homemakers add kitchen waste and charcoal to nutrient-poor tropical soil.
Photograph by Chris Johns, National Geographic

 

 

… the 17 equations that changed the world.

The Fourier transform is used to compress information for JPG images.

The Fourier transform is used to compress information for JPG images—like this one of the Fourier transform.

 

 

… what good preschools look like.

Not everyone agrees with what a good preschool looks like … Photograph by Lynn Johnson, National Geographic

Not everyone agrees with what a good preschool looks like …
Photograph by Lynn Johnson, National Geographic

 

 

… the world’s oldest library has just reopened.

The library at al-Qarawiyyin University in Fez, Morocco, opened in 859. Photograph by Anderson sady, courtesy Wikimedia. CC-BY-SA-3.0

The library at al-Qarawiyyin University in Fez, Morocco, opened in 859.
Photograph by Anderson sady, courtesy Wikimedia. CC-BY-SA-3.0

 

 

… how to craft the perfect playlist for productivity.
playlist

 

 

… how to be a better teacher: BE YOURSELF.

Dr. Alexander Kellner and local museum founder Placido Cidade Nuvens show the next generation of paleontologists a pterosaur fossil found near their village on the Araripe Plateau in northeastern Brazil. Kellner helps demonstrate how pterosaurs became "Lords of the Brazilian Sky"—the name of one of his books. Photograph by Jonathan Blair, National Geographic

Dr. Alexander Kellner and local museum founder Placido Cidade Nuvens show the next generation of paleontologists a pterosaur fossil found near their village on the Araripe Plateau in northeastern Brazil. Kellner helps demonstrate how pterosaurs became “Lords of the Brazilian Sky”—the name of one of his books.
Photograph by Jonathan Blair, National Geographic

 

7 responses to “13 Things We Learned this Week!

  1. Nice article on music.. Science in music!!! Music is like our inner soul.. Whatever kind of music we listen our mind goes on that kind of emotions… Like romantic songs make us romantic.. Sad make sad.. Nothing can touch the heart like music.. Life’s without music is incomplete…

    Like

  2. It would be a different experience sitting in the world’s first library.. I wish one day I could visit to Al -Qarawiyyin and get experience.. It would be great to read something there…

    Like

  3. Hi
    Above I noticed that one of the things you put up as learnings of the day was: giraffes did NOT evolve long necks to reach treetop greenery.
    I just want to let you know please that this theory – which is that giraffe’s necks is due to reproductive fighting, more than reaching to high branches, is not an accepted theory. It is possible – but very unlikely.
    Thanks.

    Like

  4. African Black Earth is 700 years old technique and scientists has discovered it now.. So it’s true “old is gold “… African earth black contains 200% to 300% nutrients than any other soil that’s great.. And it’s interesting to know that it’s made of waste of kitchen and charcol…

    Like

  5. All the very best to those researcher who are trying to make pig’s waste a manure.. There waste in United States is a big problem… It would be great if it could be use as an alternative for petroleum…

    Like

  6. About length of neck of giraffe my thinking was that it’s for eating from long trees but it’s also a source to attract females… That’s strange!!! More long the neck more breeds.. .

    Like

  7. Maths in pizza!!! Who will wait till so long to eat a pizza?? First derive the formula than calculations than need a better tool to cut it!!! No one can be so patient and who has time to do all this activity???I don’t think the methaetician who has derived this formula will use it!!!

    Like

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