10 Things We Learned This Week

What did you learn this week? Let us know in the comments or at education@ngs.org.

This week, we learned …

… crosswalk buttons are just one example of “placebo buttons” that don’t actually do anything.

 

fish pee may help save coral reefs, and a fisherman found a 75-pound pearl in a giant clam.

 

… Uganda may be the best place to be a refugee.

 

… how designers and scientists are using bees to map microbes.

Map by Holobiont Urbanism

Map by Holobiont Urbanism

 

… college won’t train you for a job. It will make you a better person.

These college students volunteer with the Michigan Urban Farming Initiative, helping to weed, garden, and pick up trash in a Midtown Detroit neighborhood. Photograph by Wayne Lawrence, National Geographic

These college students volunteer with the Michigan Urban Farming Initiative, helping to weed, garden, and pick up trash in a Midtown Detroit neighborhood.
Photograph by Wayne Lawrence, National Geographic

 

… all about the science of farts. No, really.

  • How much space does a fart take in your body? This is the first in a series of “Science Questions from a Toddler.” What are some other toddler-ready science queries? Can you answer them?
  • Video: How do fish use farts to communicate?

 

… a tiny relative of the jelly just shut down the Jellystone Yellowstone River.

Tiny microbes called myxozoans are devastating the native trout population of the beautiful Yellowstone River. Photograph by Robb Kendrick, National Geographic

Tiny microbes called myxozoans are devastating the native trout population of the beautiful Yellowstone River.
Photograph by Robb Kendrick, National Geographic

  • Would you shut down a popular tourist area in your region if a parasite was threatening a species of fish? Why or why not?
  • Would you shut down a popular tourist area in your region if a parasite was threatening a species of insect? Why or why not? Would it make a difference if the insect was a mosquito or a butterfly?
  • Photo Study Guide: How do bloodthirsty parasites drink up?

 

… how South Africa’s first black female pilot is helping other African women take off.

 

… the world’s biggest record collection—more than six million albums—might become a public archive.

 

… a brief history of chairs. It’s more fascinating than you think.

The earliest use of chairs is documented in ancient Egypt, and were symbols of power and authority. Here, beachgoers tote their authority in Nantucket, Massachusetts. Photograph by James L. Stanfield, National Geographic

The earliest use of chairs is documented in ancient Egypt, and were symbols of power and authority. Here, beachgoers tote their authority in Nantucket, Massachusetts.
Photograph by James L. Stanfield, National Geographic

3 responses to “10 Things We Learned This Week

  1. Before reading this article I never thought that a chair would have it’s own history.. Now whenever I’ll sit on a chair this article will always remind me it’s history… Thanks to Nat geo…

  2. It’s was quite interesting to read about the science of fart.. Well basically it’s just a diagpharm that dropped out and causes to push our tommy out..

  3. Coral reefs are so fascinating for me.. They are beautiful to watch.. Many kind of colors in a group.. Pee of fish is a nutrient for coral.. Very strange to hear this but a good research.. Over fishing is already not good for marine life .. So we should stop this at least for the sake of coral reefs. ..

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