America’s Most Endangered Historical Sites

UNITED STATES

The National Trust for Historic Preservation has announced its annual list of America’s “Most Endangered Historic Places.” All of the featured sites were nominated for their historical or architectural significance, their deteriorating conditions, and the viability of a solution to restore them. (National Trust for Historic Preservation)

Use today’s MapMaker Interactive map to navigate these important parts of our heritage.

Teachers, scroll down for a quick list of key resources in our Teachers Toolkit.

Take a look at today’s MapMaker Interactive map to navigate the 11 Most Endangered Historical Sites. All information taken from the good folks at the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

Take a look at today’s MapMaker Interactive map to navigate the 11 Most Endangered Historical Sites. All information was taken from the good folks at the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

Discussion Ideas

  • Many of the endangered historic sites address cultural and ethnic diversity in the United States. Can students identify these cultural markers?
    • Azikiwe-Nkrumah Hall at Lincoln University. This site is the oldest building on the campus of Lincoln University and the site of the first degree-granting institution in the world to educate former slaves.
    • Bears Ears. This site includes archaeological sites, cliff dwellings, petroglyphs and ancient roads that tell stories of diverse people over the course of 12,000 years of human history.
    • El Segundo Barrio and Chihuahuita. These neighborhoods served as the “Ellis Island of the Border,” playing host to Mexican families seeking a better life in the United States.
    • Lions Municipal Golf Course. This site is often recognized as the first desegregated golf course in the South.

 

  • The preservation of two sites on the list, San Francisco’s Embarcadero and Milwaukee’s Mitchell Park Domes, relies on “alternative use” and “creative re-use” of the structures. Can you brainstorm some creative ways these historic buildings could be reused?
    • Hotels, restaurants, or other hospitality venues?
    • City athletic parks?
    • Science centers?
    • Retail centers?
    • Amusement parks?
    • Office space?
    • Museums?

 

  • Have students read through the short list of endangered historic sites. Which sites would they prioritize for preservation? Why?
    • Issues you may want to consider:
      • How much would preservation activity cost?
      • What is the environmental cost of preservation activity? What is the environmental cost of not taking action to preserve the site?
      • What communities or individuals would benefit from the preservation activity?
      • Is the preservation activity economically and environmentally sustainable?

 

  • Can students identify any local historic sites? Consider the cultural, ethnic, physical, or representational history of your region.
    • Is there a building with a high-water mark from an historic flood?
    • Does a natural or man-made site (such as a river or building) have historical significance to regional settlement?
    • Does a natural landmark serve as an important ecological site, such as a lake being a stopover for migrating birds?
    • Was any local building the site for a local civil rights or social justice event?
    • Is there a local building that was designed or constructed by an important historic or artistic figure?
    • Does a building or other site serve as a representative of a technological achievement?

 

TEACHERS TOOLKIT

National Trust for Historic Preservation: America’s Most Endangered Historical Sites

Nat Geo: America’s Most Endangered Historical Sites map

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