10 Things We Learned This Week!

What did you learn this week? We learned …

… you can print your own portable universe—for free!

 

… how to navigate the languages of New York. Editor’s pick of the week!

Map by Jill Huble

Map by Jill Huble

 

… why earworm songs are earworm songs.

 

… all about the archivists, folklorists, and curators fighting to save South Sudan.

These South Sudanese students are attending class at the Kakuma refugee camp in Kenya. Photograph by D. Willetts, courtesy UNESCO and Wikimedia. CC-BY-SA-3.0

These South Sudanese students are attending class at the Kakuma refugee camp in Kenya.
Photograph by D. Willetts, courtesy UNESCO and Wikimedia. CC-BY-SA-3.0

 

… why London didn’t quite redesign after the great fire, and why that’s a good thing.

Painting by Philippe-Jacques de Loutherbourg, Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection

Painting by Philippe-Jacques de Loutherbourg, Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection

 

… Mount St. Helens has a stone cold heart.

There’s no magma beneath the crater of Mount St. Helens’ beautiful, cold, steamy peak. It borrows magma from nearby Mount Adams. Photograph by Diane Cook and Len Jenshel, National Geographic

There’s no magma beneath the crater of Mount St. Helens’ sumptuous summit. It borrows magma from nearby Mount Adams in an example of nature’s excellent pipefitting.
Photograph by Diane Cook and Len Jenshel, National Geographic

 

… millimeters-thick foam can obliterate bullets.

 

… why we still need cartographers.

 

… a bloody stake stands as a monument to Ivan the Terrible.

Vladislav Gultyaev installed the “alternative monument” after the city of Orel erected a more traditional equestrian statue of the Russian czar. Photograph by Vladislav Gultyaev, courtesy VKontakte

Vladislav Gultyaev installed this “alternative monument” after the city of Orel erected a more traditional equestrian statue of the Russian czar.
Photograph by Vladislav Gultyaev, courtesy VKontakte

 

… why we’re still fascinated by civilizations sunk beneath the waves.

Behold a 2011 interpretation of a 1648 map of 360 BCE Platonic dialogue, of a 600 CE myth: Atlantis. Yes, we’re still fascinated. Map by Rodrigo Boos, courtesy Wikimedia. CC-BY-SA-3.0

Behold a 2011 interpretation … of a 1648 map … of 360 BCE Platonic dialogue … of a 600 CE myth: Atlantis. Yes, we’re still fascinated.
Map by Rodrigo Boos, courtesy Wikimedia. CC-BY-SA-3.0

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