11 Things We Learned This Week

What did you learn this week? This week, we learned …

… the concept of “learning styles” may be one of the biggest neuroscience—and education—myths.

The National Geography Standards are a great jumping-off point for any learning style.

 

… vampire bats are now sucking blood from humans at night.

This vampire bat is feeding on a healthy calf, not a human! Photograph by Bruce Dale, National GeographicPhotograph by Bruce Dale, National Geographic

This vampire bat is feeding on a healthy calf, not a human!
Photograph by Bruce Dale, National GeographicPhotograph by Bruce Dale, National Geographic

What other animals drink up on human blood?

 

Norway is transitioning away from FM radio entirely, and neon signs are a dying art.

How do engineers make neon signs?

 

… a remote town in Romania has become the world’s cybercrime capital.

Where else do cyberattacks originate?

 

… when one scientist talks about climate change, he doesn’t talk about science. Read of the week!

This classic Nat Geo map depicts climate change since 1960. Map by National Geographic

This classic Nat Geo map depicts climate change since 1960.
Map by National Geographic

How can you “act on climate”?

 

… the physics of jumping in Super Mario Run.

You can test the physics of motion using Super Mario, but can you test the physics of light speed with Peeps?

 

… a 3,500-year-old Greek tomb upended what we thought we knew about Western Civilization.

This beautiful gold ring was buried with the so-called Griffin Warrior, whose grave contained Minoan-influenced artifacts. Compare the artistry of this “bull ring” with the different sort of Minoan bullring here. Photograph by Department of Classics, University of Cincinnati

The so-called “Griffin Warrior” is also called the “Lord of the Four Rings” because of his beautiful gold signet rings.
Photograph by Department of Classics, University of Cincinnati

Who was the “Griffin Warrior” that is changing the way we think about Ancient Greece?

 

… endangered rhinos use poop piles like a social network.

Black rhinos, like this beauty in Aberdare National Park, Kenya, are critically endangered. There are fewer than 6,000 in the wild. Photograph by Steve Raymer, National Geographic

Black rhinos, like this beauty in Aberdare National Park, Kenya, are critically endangered. There are fewer than 6,000 in the wild.
Photograph by Steve Raymer, National Geographic

Why should we care about endangered species?

 

… all the oranges, lemons, limes, and grapefruits you’ve ever eaten are descendants from just five ancient species.

This beautiful illustration of the citrus family tree will appear in the February issue of National Geographic magazine. Illustration by Monica Serrano, National Geographic

This beautiful illustration of the citrus family tree will appear in the February issue of National Geographic magazine.
Illustration by Monica Serrano, National Geographic

Which of our favorite citrus threatened by weather and bacteria?

 

… Amazon basin rainfall responds closely to changes in glacial boundary conditions.

Zoom, zoom, zoom on this beautiful map from the October 2015 issue of National Geographic magazine. The largest terrestrial carbon sink in the world, the Amazon rain forest is threatened by drought that is slowing the growth rate of trees. Map by National Geographic magazine

Zoom, zoom, zoom on this beautiful map from the October 2015 issue of National Geographic magazine.
Map by National Geographic magazine

What is the annual precipitation in the Amazon? How does it compare to other regions?

 

… our favorite pop culture graphics of the week visualized Imperial losses from the original Star Wars trilogy and used the Sorting Hat on tech companies.

That yellow border apparently means something. We’re Hufflepuffs. (Individually, I’m a Ravenclaw.)

That yellow border apparently means something. We’re Hufflepuffs. (Individually, I’m a Ravenclaw.)

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