11 Things We Learned This Week

This week, we learned …

… Fantasia’s dinosaurs were the cutting edge of paleontology in the 1940s.

How has paleontology changed in the last 77 years?

 

… an anonymous buyer paid $14,600 for a dish of mold.

Why was the mold so valuable?

 

… Africa’s resilient cities are planning for the future.

Victoria Island is popular weekend hangout for middle-class Lagosians and foreigners. Photograph by Robin Hammond, National Geographic

Victoria Island is popular weekend hangout for middle-class Lagosians and foreigners.
Photograph by Robin Hammond, National Geographic

What are the most pressing issues for Africa’s growing urban geography?

 

… how to make scientifically accurate cakes.

Learn a little about our eight-planet system!

 

… a small city in Iowa is devoting 1,000 acres of land to America’s vanishing bees.

Cedar Rapids, Iowa, is restoring native prairie grasses in an attempt to restore pollinator-friendly fields. Photograph by James L. Amos, National Geographic

Cedar Rapids, Iowa, is restoring native prairie grasses in an attempt to restore pollinator-friendly fields.
Photograph by James L. Amos, National Geographic

How can you attract pollinators to your class garden?

 

… why facts don’t change our minds.

We give you the facts, and want you to evaluate them for yourself!

 

… Peru and Bolivia are working to clean up Lake Titicaca.

Lake Titicaca sits in the Andes, about 3,810 meters (12,500 feet) above sea level, making it the world’s highest lake. Photograph by Carl S. Bell, National Geographic

Lake Titicaca sits in the Andes, about 3,810 meters (12,500 feet) above sea level, making it the world’s highest lake.
Photograph by Carl S. Bell, National Geographic

What prompted the concern about Lake Titicaca?

 

… you can buy a biodegradable, seaweed-based glitter egg—just in time for Easter.

How did the ancient Maya use mica ‘glitter’ to make their temples gleam?

 

… ‘which came first: the chicken or the egg’ is still a really contentious question.

Most scientists think it was the egg. Photograph by B. Anthony Stewart, National Geographic

Most scientists think it was the egg.
Photograph by B. Anthony Stewart, National Geographic

Can you complete these egg-speriments?

 

… corn first entered the U.S. through the Sierra Madre mountains.

Corn was first cultivated in Mesoamerica, and made its way to what is now the U.S. states of New Mexico and Arizona about 4,000 years ago. Photograph by Richard Barnes, National Geographic

Corn was first cultivated in Mesoamerica, and made its way to what is now the U.S. states of New Mexico and Arizona about 4,000 years ago.
Photograph by Richard Barnes, National Geographic

What is corn?

 

… 53 ways to check for understanding.

Check for Understanding
How does your evaluation fit in with our Learning Framework?

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